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    CEO Nance Rosen, Producer John Tyler, Creative Partner "Famous" Alice Linesch

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One-on-one Coaching • Workshops • Online Training

Fear Your High School Reunion!

Posted by on Oct 29, 2014 in Career, Personal Branding, success | No Comments

School reunion concept.

Last Saturday night I was the “plus one” at a high school reunion, where people were frankly in shock. It had been 30 years – 30 years! – since they’d all been together at Lakeland Regional High in Wanaque, New Jersey.

How will you account for three decades that start the moment you begin life, without adult supervision?

How will you explain the lapse of time between now and when you did or didn’t get into your first choice of college, maybe started spending student loan money like you’d never have to repay it or just up and started working or maybe drifting?

One thing for sure. Be careful of getting a job. You might look up 30 years later, waiting for retirement to kick in. Working at a big box store or whatever you land at 18 can be addictive. When you’re too young, the feeling of money in your pocket never gets old… until you do. Then in 30 years you wind up faced with the lives of adventurers and risk-takers, and you’re in the mirror with the same old, same old.

Imagine walking into a hotel ballroom with a deejay playing the soundtrack of your teenage years. Will you still be schlepping your high school sweetheart around the floor?

Imagine the tyranny is over. The dominance of jocks, the secrecy of nerds, the relentless buoyancy of cheer squad and the brotherhood of hipsters smoking in the parking lot – all behind you. (Actually, the hipsters will still go out into the parking lot to smoke.)

Here’s what I observed in place of these old roles. You become a person over 30 years. You drop the attitude, the chip on your shoulder, and the previously endless scrutiny of who’s hot and who’s not. Instead you remember so much, so fondly. Everyone talks to everyone. There are hugs and tears and the whole group dancing badly on the dance floor, in some strange geometric shape that simply means “we survived!”

Fear your high school reunion. Let that motivate you to live a life with stories to tell, adventures you’ve had and failure that taught you resilience and perseverance and came with a big dose of optimism.

You’ll probably be wrinkled, fat, bald or looking older than you ever thought possible. But, it’s all good if happened with the excitement of life experiences.

Now get to work on living – really living! You’ll need stories to tell.

Why You Need a Lifeguard to Get a Promotion

Posted by on Oct 22, 2014 in Career, Personal Branding, success | No Comments

stock-footage-newquay-cornwall-england-september-rnli-safety-surfboard-on-beach-lifeguard-walks-past-onNo matter where you live and where you want to work, there’s probably an ocean between you and what you want. No, I don’t mean the vast body of water that covers 71% of the planet. It’s not that you live in the UK and want to work in the US. Not that kind of ocean.

It’s the ocean of thoughts that swim around your brain. Constantly circulating thoughts, feelings, and past experiences.

These include the hurts, insults, misunderstandings, false accusations, lack of validation and other debris leftover from all the people who ever spoke to you unkindly – accidentally or intentionally. All the efforts you made that went unrewarded. All the dreams that couldn’t be sustained, in reality.

This internal pollution typically isn’t visible at the surface.

I know. I have an ocean, too. I’ve had to dredge it, sift it, cleanse it and recirculate it. It’s actually part of the work I do regularly, along with checking my calendar and making my bed. It’s a daily ritual. So, when I speak to you, my ocean is clean and clear. That freshness allows me to simply say what I mean. Ask what I need to know. Listen to what you say. Hear what you mean.

In almost every interaction, I see all the old trash that litters the present consciousness of the person I’m speaking to.

Largely, this is my job. I am a communications and career coach. When you speak, I listen for what will move you forward and what is holding you back. If my ocean of thoughts were littered with the remnants of uncomfortable past experiences, I would not have a clear mind to help you read yours.

While you may rarely speak to a communications coach, most everyone else you speak to knows what I know, just in a different way. They sense that something is wrong with you. They might think you’re unqualified, overqualified, defensive, evasive, irritable, moody, inconsistent, unreliable, nervous, rude or just nutty.

If you have not succeeded, it’s largely because you are sinking in your own ocean. The undertow keeps you from being entirely present and clearly engaged with the people and opportunities around you. That’s what’s cluttering up your communication and stopping people from trusting you, liking you and caring about you. That’s why they are reluctant to hire you, promote you, award you a raise, invest in you and otherwise help you get where you want to go. It’s why you’re stopped, stalled, irritated, and find yourself stuck with “difficult” people. It’s why you don’t get a response to your resume or calls, it’s this sense that you’re somehow not “right.”

The fix? Get yourself a stack of index cards. With every negative thought – like a desire to complain, procrastinate, challenge authority or otherwise undermine yourself – take a card and write it down. Then ask yourself: “Who first told me that?” “Who gave me this impression of myself or the world?”

Do it now and never stop. Oceans need lifeguards. You are yours. If you want more tips on this, email Nance@NanceRosen.com. Subject line: Ocean.

What You Don’t Know About Yourself is Shocking

Posted by on Oct 15, 2014 in Career, Personal Branding, success | No Comments

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photos-finger-pressing-escape-grey-computer-keyboard-white-image30894333This coming weekend, I give the only personal branding boot camp on campus at UCLA.There might be a seat or two left, so if you are in Los Angeles, you might want to come. Why?

If you have failed to get the job you love or you are failing in the career you thought you would love, there’s only one reason. You lack the one thing that flips the switch of real, deep, sustainable success. That one thing is personal intelligence.

Sure, in camp we’ll go over the amazing new changes on LinkedIn, Instagram and the social media you’re probably stabbing at for several years now.  I say stabbing, because most people are killing their careers and their future relationships by what they post. And, I don’t mean killing as in “you’re killing it.” I mean you are either dying by a thousand paper cuts or doing more direct and severe damage with your pics and posts.

It’s not the obvious ones, like pics of your dancing with a bear naked in Cabo. Take those down.

What’s killing your career is the lack of deep insights about yourself. And, how the lack of that shows up in your pics and posts.

Your lack of empathy, sympathy and congratulation is shocking.

No, not for other people. For yourself. Think of that the next time you look at a keyboard and see ESC. Think: Empathy, Sympathy and Congratulations for yourself.

ESC – “escape” is what personal intelligence is.

To be successful, you must escape from the judgment of others. Escape the old messages and unfair expectations pressed upon you.

It’s shocking, isn’t it? That you successfully went to school, or maybe dropped out, and got into the working world, or maybe have not, all without a single day devoted to getting to know who YOU really are and what YOU really want.

So, I’ll be at UCLA this weekend, October 18 and 19, with my campers in a safe and nourishing place, to lead that discovery and watch success being birthed.

It’s a big highlight of my year. I am so thrilled and beyond honored to say to my campers: the next phone call you get can change your life. So, it’s worth the time to know what you want. As the Spice Girls and I say: what YOU really, really want.

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